eye_ear

Vision, Hearing, Eye Movements, and the Brain

Jennifer M. Groh, Ph.D.

 
line decor
  
line decor
 
 
 
 

 
 
OUR MISSION

How do our senses work together? Our eyes and ears cooperate to help us understand our environment. We frequently perceive visual and auditory stimuli as being bound together if they seem likely to have arisen from a common source. That's why we tend not to notice that the speakers on TV sets or in movie theatres are located beside, and not behind, the screen. Research in my laboratory is devoted to investigating the question of how the brain coordinates the information arising from the ears and eyes. Our findings challenge the historical view of the brain's sensory processing as being automatic, autonomous, and immune from outside influence.

THE BRAIN AND SPACE

I believe space is so important to brain function that I've written a whole book about it! Making Space: How the Brain Knows Where Things Are, Harvard University Press, November 2014. For a general audience, including interested students. Supported by a Guggenheim fellowship. See Table of Contents and Index.

Making Space: How the Brain Knows Where Things Are

You can also take my free online course The Brain and Space on Coursera. Open for enrollment now (October-November 2014).

MEDIA COVERAGE

I'll be on BBC World Service: The Forum on October 18, 2014: Natural Navigation

What timing! Maybe the Nobel committee took my online course. Video of lecture explaining the work honored by the 2014 Medicine Nobel can be seen here.

Ventriloquism and the Brain on CBC's Quirks and Quarks. More here. Article in Telegraph.

Another ventriloquism study.

POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AVAILABLE

A postdoctoral position is available to study spatial processing in the auditory and visual systems of the brain. Several different research questions are available for study: visual influences over hearing; coding of multiple sounds; and the role of parietal cortex in connecting spatial locations across time. A strong quantitative background is essential. Experience in neurophysiology, animal training, and/or auditory psychophysics is preferred.To apply, please email plain text cover letter including the names of 2-3 references and CV to jmgroh@duke.edu. (Posted October 2014).

 

foo
GRADUATE STUDENT OPENINGS

I anticipate an opening for a graduate student for the fall of 2015. Most of my students come from one of the following programs: Psychology and Neuroscience, Neurobiology, or the Cognitive Neuroscience Admitting Program. I encourage interested applicants to contact me at: .contact and to consider taking my Coursera course on "The Brain and Space". This course will give you a taste of how I like to think about the brain as well as an introduction to some of our scientific discoveries and those of other researchers.

COMMUNICATING ABOUT SCIENCE

I occasionally tweet about science, education, and policy as JMGrohNeuro. Here is my ResearchGate profile

ANNE'S LIST

(Last updated October, 2014

 
 
 

 

THE BRAIN AND SPACE
What Copernicus and your brain have in common.

NEURAL CODES
Does your brain think in digital or analog?

SEEING EARS AND HEARING EYES
How your brain combines what you see with what you hear.

BRAIN STIMULATION AND AUDITORY PROSTHESES
What monkeys hear when activity is electrically evoked in the auditory pathway, and what that means for designing auditory brain prostheses for hearing-impaired humans.
 
 
   
  
             
    PEOPLE

 

     
Jennifer Groh
 

JENNIFER M. GROH, PH.D

LAB DIRECTOR

Professor
Dept. of Psychology and Neuroscience

Dept. of Neurobiology
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

(CV)


LAB DIRECTOR
Professor
Dept. of Psychology and Neuroscience
Dept. of Neurobiology
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

(CV)

   
           
Valeria Caruso
  VALERIA CARUSO   POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW    
  CHRISTIE HOLMES   LAB MANAGER    
Kurtis Gruters
  KURTIS GRUTERS   GRADUATE STUDENT    
           
           
  DANIEL PAGES   RESEARCH ASSOCIATE    
  .        
             
             
    CONTACT US        
   
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
LSRC Rm. B203
Box 90999
Duke University
Durham, NC, 27708

Phone: 919-681-6536
Fax: 919-681-0815

Email: