Philipp Sadowski


PUBLISHED AND FORTHCOMING PAPERS

Magical Thinking: A Representation Result, with Brendan Daley [April 2016]
Theoretical Economics, forthcoming
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Supplementary Appendix

Overeagerness [August 2016]
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, forthcoming
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A Theory of Subjective Learning, with David Dillenberger, Juan Lleras, and Norio Takeoka [September 2014]
Some results previously appeared in "Subjective Learning" with David Dillenberger.
Journal of Economic Theory, Vol 153, 287-312
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Dynamic Preference for Flexibility, with R. Vijay Krishna [May 2014]
Econometrica, Vol 82(2), 655-704
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Contingent Preference for Flexibility: Eliciting Beliefs from Behavior [May 2013]
Theoretical Economics, Vol 8, 503-534
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Ashamed to be Selfish, with David Dillenberger [January 2012]
Theoretical Economics, Vol 7, 99-124
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WORKING PAPERS

Subjective Information Choice Processes with David Dillenberger and R. Vijay Krishna [January 2017]
Abstract
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Supplementary Appendix

Inertial Behavior and Generalized Partition with David Dillenberger [May 2016]
Some results previously appeared in "Subjective Learning" with David Dillenberger. This paper supersedes ERID-132.
Abstract
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Preferences with Taste Shock Representations: Price Volatility and the Liquidity Premium,
with R. Vijay Krishna [June 2016]
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Randomly Evolving Tastes and Delayed Commitment, with R. Vijay Krishna [June 2016]
Abstract: We consider a decision maker with randomly evolving tastes who faces dynamic decision situations that involve intertemporal tradeoffs, such as those in consumption savings problems. We axiomatize a recursive representation of choice that features uncertain consumption utilities, which evolve according to a subjective Markov process. The parameters of the representation, which are the subjective Markov process governing the evolution of utilities, and the discount factor, are uniquely identified from behavior. We relate the correlation of tastes over time and the desire to delay commitment to future consumption.

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Department of Economics, Duke University, Box 90097, Durham, NC 27708, USA | 919 660 1821 | p.sadowski (at) duke (dot) edu