grk 280s

epigraphy

syllabus f11


human: Joshua D. Sosin
coordinates: Allen 229 TTh 08:30-09:45
access:

Allen 229A / OH: M 1400-1530, F 1300-1400;
and any time my office door is open


Spiel: This course is an introduction to epigraphic Greek. Our principal concern will be not so much the history and methods of the subdiscipline, as a broad survey of the kinds of things (and kind of Greek) you will find engraved in antiquity's hard surfaces. We'll get where we're going by translating a wide sample of epigraphic Greek.

Books: No required purchases for this course. But if I had only 200 dollars to spend on Greek epigraphy books, I would buy W. Dittenberger, Dittenberger, Sylloge Inscriptionum Graecarum, 3rd ed. (Ditt. Syll.3); you can find lots of POD copies, but I've never had very good luck with such; The Ares reprints are good.

Screed: Translate from a clean text. You learn to read Greek by reading Greek. On Vocab Lists: The production of lists may assist in acquisition of vocabulary, but in class you should put the list away and try to remember or infer meaning. Such lists might help you get through a day’s portion, but if you really want to learn words, you should rely on repeated exposure and repeated consultation of the dictionary (good dictionaries make good reading). On Heavily Annotated Xeroxes: To read Latin and Greek successfully you must learn mentally to cache meaning and syntax from the moment you start to read a sentence through to its end. A heavily annotated text invites you to get by without flexing that mental muscle. If it is your practice to bring such to class, please wean yourself from the habit by the end of week three, beyond which such are not allowed. On Written Translations: The act of composing a written translation is, in my opinion, the single best way to show yourself and others what you think something means. So, by all means, write out translations if it helps you grow as a reader; but do not bring them to class.

If you forget something, ask. If you could not figure something out, ask. Someone in the room should know! If no one does, well, we'll look it up together.


 

Week Tuesday Thursday

α

η/λ - Intro / Background / Tools

θ/α - Archaic
READ: L. Robert, "Les épigraphies et l'épigraphie grecque et romaine," OMS V 65-109.
READ
: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 1
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 2
READ: IG IX,1 867
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 7

READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 8
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 10
READ: IG I³ 948
READ: IG IX.1².3.609
READ: IG I³ 1
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 17

β

θ/ϛ - Classical
READ: IC IV 72.i-iii.44
READ: IG IX.12.3.718

θ/η - Classical
READ: Ditt. Syll.3 31
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 28
READ: PHI Teos 261
READ: IG I3 10
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 32
READ: IG XIV 268
READ: IG I3 40
READ: IG I3 52.A
READ: IG I3 369.1-29

IDENTIFY (spend no more than 10 mins): textOne, textTwo, textThree, textFour, textFive

γ

θ/ιγ - Classical
READ: IG I3 78a
READ: IG I3 84
READ: IG I3 350, 351, 353
READ: IG XII,9 187A, 187B
READ: Meiggs-Lewis, GHI 83
READ: IG I3 102
READ: IGI3 127

LOG 01 DUE

 

θ/ιε - Fourth Century
READ: Rhodes-Osborne, GHI II 1 A and C only
READ: IPArk. 9
READ: Rhodes-Osborne, GHI II 22.1-78
READ: Rhodes-Osborne, GHI II 25
READ: Rhodes-Osborne, GHI II 26
READ: Agora XIX P5
READ: Agora XIX L4a (363/2)
READ: Rhodes-Osborne, GHI II 39
READ: Ditt. Syll.3 194

 

Take home Quiz due next Mon

δ

θ/κ - Fourth Century
READ: I.Mylasa I 1, 2, 3
READ: IG II2 141
READ: I.Labraunda 40
READ: I.Erythrai 8
READ: Ditt. Syll.3 963
READ: CID 2.34
READ: Agora XV 34.1-16
READ: SEG LI 1105
READ: Agora XVI 73

LOG 02 DUE

 

 

θ/κβ - Fourth Century
READ: Heisserer, Alexander p.80
READ: Rhodes-Osborne, GHI II 87
READ: IG II2 337
READ: I.Oropos 295
READ: I.Oropos 296
READ: I.Oropos 297
READ: I.Oropos 298
READ: I.Oropos 299
READ: Lupu, NGSL 2
READ: Schwenk, Athens in the Age of Alexander 48
READ: IG II2 1629.128-302
READ: IG II2 4319
READ: IG II2 6217

ε

θ/κζ - Religion
READ: IG IV2.1 121.1-33
READ: IG X.2.1 255
READ: SEG XXXI 122
READ: Syll.3 985
READ
: Lupu, NGSL 18
READ: I.Priene 174
READ:
LCSG 97
READ: IMT Kaikos 922
READ: IG XII.9 189
READ: LSAM 53
READ: LSAM 31

READ: OGIS 569

LOG 03 DUE

 

θ/κθ - Religion
READ: Syll.3 736 (Read this in English; we will sight read bits)

READ
: Petzl, Beichtinschriften 1, 3, 4, 5, 57, 69
READ: IG XII.8 265
READ: IG II2 1368
READ: IG II2 1325, 1326, 2948
READ: SEG LIV 743
READ: IGLS IV 1261
READ: IG X.2 3
READ: IG XII.3 248
READ: Varinioglu, in The Salmakis Inscription and Hellenistic Halikarnassos (Odense 2004) 125–131, at 127–128.
READ: IG II2 204

ϛ

ι/δ - Polis / Institutions
READ: IG II2 380
READ: Klaffenbach, Die Astynomeninschrift (long)
READ: IG XII.6.1.95
READ: IG IX.12.2.583
READ: I.Rhamnous 17

READ: IG II2 659
READ: Lupu, NGSL 26
READ: IG XII.8 264

IDENTIFY (spend no more than 10 mins): textOne, textTwo, textThree, textFour, textFive

LOG 04 DUE

ι/ϛ - Polis / Institutions
READ: IMT Aisep/Kad Dere 1135
READ: SEG XXXIII 679
READ: I.Kato.Mak. 1 (long)
READ: Welles, RC 3 (long)
READ: SEG XLVII 1745

READ: Meletemata 22 app.no.12

READ: Chaniotis, Verträge 7

Take home Quiz due next Wed

ζ

ι/ια - FALL BREAK NO CLASS

ι/ιγ - Benefaction
READ: IG XII.6.1.11
READ: Syll.3 495 (long)
READ: IG XII.6.1.12
READ:
I.Sestos 1 (long)
READ: I.Eythrai 503
READ:
I.Eph 1455
READ: IG XII.3 170

η

ι/ιη - Benefaction
READ: SEG XXXVIII 1462
READ: SEG XXVIII 60
READ: IG XII.7 386
READ: IG IX.2 62
READ: I.Eph. 1491

LOG 05 DUE

ι/κ - Econ
READ: Migeotte, Emprunt 97
READ: OGIS 572
READ: I.Mylasa I 605
READ: IG XII suppl 347
READ: CID IV 127
READ: IG V.1 1421
READ: I.Délos 509
READ: I.Kalchedon 16
READ: FD III.1 294 col.i-iii

READ: IG VII 3073


θ

ι/κε - Econ
READ: IG XII.6.172
READ: D. Samsaris, Dodone 18 (1980) 203-382, no.111
READ: I.Eph. 8 (here and here)
READ: Migeotte, Emprunt 103
READ: Migeotte, Emprunt 97
READ: OGIS 674
READ: IG XIV 830
READ: SEG XXVI 1392
READ: IGBulg IV 2236 with SEG XLIV 610

READ: IGLS V 1998
READ: OGIS 609

LOG 06 DUE

ι/κζ - Rome
READ: RDGE 5
READ: RGDE 49
READ: I.Oropos 308 and in case your PDF is choking on some of the characters: see PHI text
READ: RGDE 65A, 65D
READ: Syll.3 684
READ: OGIS 315
READ: Syll.3 646
READ: SEG IX 7
READ: SEG LII 1464ter

Take home Quiz due next Mon

ι

ια/α - Rome
READ: SEG IX 8
READ: SEG XLV 1772C

READ: Syll.3 797
READ: Syll.3 867
READ: McCrum-Woodhead 458
READ: IG V.1 1432, 1433

LOG 07 DUE

ια/3 - Literature
READ: IG I3 1194bis
READ: IG IV2.1 128
READ: Robert, CRAI (1968) 416-57
READ: IGUR III 1336
READ: SEG XLI 1411
READ: IG XI.4 1299


ια

ια/η - Literature
READ: Selected epigrams; these are numerous but short; read as many as you can in the apropriate amount of timme:

CEG 429 | FD III.4.137 | GVI 1960 | GVI 942 | I.Erythrai 210a | I.Olympia 266 | I.Rhamnous 260 | I.Rhamnous 273 | IG I3 1143 | IG I3 1154 | IG I3 1204 | IG I3 1208 | IG I3 1219 | IG I3 1240 | IG I3 1353 | IG I3 1356 | IG I3 533 | IG I3 728 | IG I3 828 | I.Metr. 83 | IG XII.2 458 | IG XII.2 459 | IG II2 10435 | IG II2 10510 | IG II2 10954 | IG II2 11169 | IG II2 11974 | IG II2 12335 | IG II2 12974 | IG II2 5239 | IG II2 6288 | IG II2 6551 | IG II2 7151 | IG II2 7711 | IG II2 7863 | IG II2 7873 | IG II2 7965 | IG II2 8388 | IG II2 8708 | IG II2 8870 | IG II2 8883 | IG IV 800 | IG IX,1 290 | IG IX,1 868 | IG XII suppl. 412 | IG XII.5 215 | IG XII.8 398 | IG XII.8 683 | IG XII.9 285 | SEG 25.299 | SEG 30.218 |

LOG 08 DUE

ια/ι - States and relations
READ: SEG XXXVIII 1476
READ: Staatsv. III 429
READ: Welles, RC 7
READ: Syll.3 443
READ: Staatsv. III 482

re Syll.3 443 note what happens when you start with one half of the stone and find the other.

ιβ

ια/ιε - States and relations
READ: Syll.3 581
READ: Staatsv. III 545
READ: Syll.3 647
READ: Syll.3 675
READ: Syll.3 543

LOG 09 DUE

ια/ιζ - States and relations
READ: Asylia 66-131

Take home Quiz due next Mon


ιγ

ια/κβ - Emperors and Kings
READ: IG XII.5 132
READ: IG XII.3 174
READ: IG VII 2713
READ: SEG L 1195
READ: OGIS 266
READ: IGLS VII 4028
READ: OGIS 56
READ: OGIS 90

READ: SEG XXXVII 593

READ: SEG XI 922

LOG 10 DUE

ια/κδ - THANKSGIVING NO CLASS

ιδ

ια/κθ - Sight Fest
READ: Brown's
READ: Dudley's
READ: Graham's
READ: Hoffman's
READ: Seufert's
READ
: Shea's
READ: Smith-MacDonald's
READ
: Zalin's

ιβ/α - Sight Fest
READ: Brown's
READ: Dudley's
READ: Graham's
READ: Hoffman's
READ: Seufert's
READ: Shea's
READ: Smith-MacDonald's
READ
: Zalin's


COUNT:

  1. daily translation: 40% of grade; this is the most critical feature of the course. We shall devote the bulk of each day in class to translating aloud, quickly, fluently, confidently. Starting in week 3, the last 20 minutes of each Thursday (maybe some Tuesdays as well) will be spent sight reading. To start, I'll bring some suitable texts; but if any of you would like to contribute a good one, bring enough copies for all of us. And the last week of class will be entirely devoted to sight reading. By 11/17 each of you should have submitted digital copies of 2 texts (or more, depending on size and difficulty) for us to read at sight in week 14.

  2. midway quizzes: 30% of grade; roughly every 3 weeks you will have the opportunity to take a translation quiz (4 quizzes total). The quizzes will mainly contain seen passages, but sight passages of a type/genre/difficulty that you have encountered already are also fair game. Procedure as follows:
    • I'll distribute the quiz in class on Thursday;
    • take the quiz at your leisure over the weekend, spending no more than 75 minutes;
    • type; do not use notes, dictionaries, translations, or any other aids;
    • mark and grade a copy; feel free to use any aids you like while you are marking and grading
    • by 0900 on the following Monday email me, or leave in my mailbox, (1) a clean copy of the quiz and (2) your marked-up copy.
    • by Thursday I'll return both, with my own marks and grades
    • compare my marks and yours

  3. (almost) random reading log: 10% of grade. Throughout the semester you will keep a 'Random Reading Log'. Get into the habit of reading inscriptions at/nearly at random: pick up an edition, find a text that is reasonably whole, read it; or, start with some subject, find a couple reasonably whole texts relating to it, read them; browse a journal and find your way back to an inscription mentioned in it. This is a good custom, period, and especially so in the documentary subdisciplines. On ten occasions you will have the opportunity to write no more than one single-spaced page about something that you found interesting in your 'random' reading (must be submitted digitally, Word, googledoc, vel sim.). These exercises should be clear, coherent, and clean, but do not think of them as full-dress, formal presentations: they may be lean on footnotes; they need not be fully researched; they should be typed (Greek too) and should contain enough information for a reader (me) to find the text(s) that you are addressing. Think of these as healthy seedlings. I shall assess them on a three-point scale: 1 = you did the assignment: something was read and words were written; 2 = you did the assignment and have an idea, or the beginnings of one; 3 = you did the assignment, have an idea, and it is clear, interesting, and good. I shall give you a broad prompt within which to hunt. Cite all inscriptions by standard abbreviations. If, along the way, you turn up something cool, which you are keen for the class to read, give me a copy and some notice, and I'll try to get it on the syllabus.
    • Log 01: Anything you find interesting
    • Log 02: Not free citizen males
    • Log 03: Athletics
    • Log 04: Dialect
    • Log 05: West
    • Log 06: Inscribed on metal
    • Log 07: Macedonia
    • Log 08: Military
    • Log 09: Bi-/Multi-lingual
    • Log 10: Late Antiquity

  4. final exam: 20% of grade; translation exam, closed book.

How I grade / calculate grades:

  • Grading Written Translations:
    • I assign a total number of points per passage, based on the number of lines (e.g. 4 points per line).
    • I underline words / parts of words (if, say, tense or number or case are wrong or incorrectly construed but the word’s dictionary meaning is right) in the Greek that have been translated incorrectly.
    • I squiggly-underline words that have been translated sub-optimally but are basically right.
    • I subtract points based roughly on presence of underlined passages; this is not a strictly mathematical process; one translation may have fewer underlined words and nevertheless fall far short of coherent English, while another may have slightly more underlined words, but indicate clearer control of meaning. That figure, a percentage, provides the starting point for further calculation based on fluency of English, command of Greek and English idiom, control of finer points of grammar vel sim.
    • I shall review all of this in class.
  • Grading In-Class Translations
    • Immediately after every class I enter into a spreadsheet (1) a grade for the day (see scale) and (2) brief notes on your performance. If you are absent I'll record a 50%; don't miss class.
    • At the end of the semester I calculate an average daily reading grade. That figure, a percentage, provides the starting point for calculation of the daily translation grade--scope left for adjustment for progress.
    • If at any point you want to see your daily grades, ask.

Assessment: At the end of the semester I shall give you (grads) a brief written assessment of your performance in the class. Nothing in this document should be news to you. I ask you please--this is a requirement--to arrange to meet with me twice during the semester (once before the midpoint and once after) so that we can chat about how you are doing and how you can develop strategies for improving your skills and broadening your knowledge.